My Food Is My Identity: Is It True?

Most Indians love a hot cup of masala tea; it may be the one drink that connects our nation. In many cities, guests get the tea as the welcome drink irrespective of whether you want or not. But when I see tea, I see age-old colonialism, British rule, coercion, and the rise of opium and…

Churpi Cheese: An age-old local cheese of the Himalayan Region

India is popular for its spicy food, the chicken and other bird dishes, red meat and fish but hardly we talk about our local cheese beyond paneer. If when we talk about paneer, it gets an English name, cottage cheese which has its controversy. I think we should stick to the name “paneer”, simply because…

How does 18th century no-knead bread taste?

A few days back I saw a post on bread in one of the food groups I follow on Facebook. This post was very specific in collecting more information about Sour Dough bread (which is one of my favorites). The fellow members were quick to jump and help the information seeker. This post is dedicated…

Between Breads: Ramcharitamanas, Mughals and Age-Old History of Breads

“Here with a Loaf of Bread beneath the Bough, A Flask of Wine, a Book of Verse – and Thou Beside me singing in the Wilderness – And Wilderness is Paradise enow.”  ― Omar Khayyám, Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam Bread, the quintessential side dish that goes with most the dishes we eat, from Pasta to Vada Pav,…

History of Kadak & Garam Chai

Ek kadak garam chai ki cup is what starts the day of a lot of households around the world—some will ask for masala chai while others will call for Earl Grey. In fact, Indian tea is famous all over the world. Every time I am travelling outside India, when people offer me a cup of…

How India’s favourite flatbread Roti was born

No meal in India is complete without this quintessential flatbread. But have you ever wondered when and how this meal essential originate? Chapati, phulka, roti – no meal in India is complete without this quintessential flatbread. It’s as much an Indian cuisine table essential as rice. And while North India is known to be particularly…

Lagan nu Custard

The Lagan nu Custard is another iconic dessert that Parsis are known for. But the world also calls this dish as Flan, caramel custard, karamel pudding and there are many different names, many different variations of this simple dish. Lagan nu custard is usually served with sultanas and garnished with cashews, almonds, and pistachios but I am…

History of Pancakes: Hot off the Pan

Pancakes. The mere mention makes us drool and crave. They are the epitome of comfort food, an essential part of any Sunday brunch. Pancake is popular all over the world under different names, sizes and flavours, but regardless of what you call them they are essentially flat cakes composed of starchy batter cooked on a…

A 4500 Years Old History and Legacy of Curry

Curry is something which we think of as indigenous to India and Pakistan. But did you know that the English love their curry so much so that they even have National Curry Week? Where did this curry come from? Can we Indians claim that it originated on our land? Every household in India will have…

PASTA IS NOT ORIGINALLY FROM ITALY

Myth: Pasta originally comes from Italy. Worldwide, pasta has become synonymous with Italian cuisine. Italian immigrants themselves brought pasta everywhere they went. While it is true that the most famous varieties and recipes of cooking pasta really do come from Italy, surprisingly, the actual origin of pasta lies elsewhere! So how did pasta make its…

Chandni Chowk: Medieval, Mughal, Magical

Chandni Chowk: Medieval, Mughal, Magical Chandni Chowk, home of Mughals, Mirza Ghalib and…all foodies! Chandni Chowk teaches you how to love your age old culture, heritage and most importantly food. Streets always bustling with tradesmen, tourists and vendors will definitely transport you back in time. The place with its congested and dusty lanes holds a…

Cooking with Fire

Before cooking, food was eaten raw, decayed, and putrefied. The human discovery of roasting remains unattributed, though Charles Lamb wrongly glamorized the story of the Chinese boy who accidentally burned down his hog shed and, in trying to save a well-barbecued piglet, discovered the glory of crackling . Raw , as anthropologist Claude Lévi-Strauss insisted,…